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buddahead

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buddahead last won the day on March 19 2020

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  1. Here is a very faded front panel of the first V2V shirt, that I had designed for the V2V in 2001. FYI, I had designed the 2013 Fishy shirt to commemorate fellow member Sydney "Fishwich". who passed away suddenly. She was a leg captain of the previous year V2V, on her 2004 50th year anniversary (Polaris) Vegas. She deserves to be remembered.
  2. Your cable housing is probably coated inside with a nylon liner. Lubrication is needed most at the cable ends, as it exits the housing, and at the ends which rotate in the lever and the clutch arm. Any petroleum based lube will work, as long as it does not eat the nylon liner. If Polaris sells one, it is probably fine. To make your cables last longer I recommend rotating the housing periodically, as the cable will eventually wear into the nylon liner. I also recommend removing your clutch lever and use emery cloth to remove any burrs from the steel barrel end, clean, re-lube and your good to go. Victory bikes had a high rate of cable failure at the clutch lever end due to the sharp edges of the steel barrel cutting into the softer aluminum lever... eventually causing the barrel to stop rotating. When the barrel end cannot rotate, the cable must flex, causing the breakage. If you remove the lever and find the steel barrel has cut into the lever, you will want to replace the lever as well. I had over 100k miles on my '99 Vic cable because I found the burr in time, removed the sharp edges from the barrel end and replaced the damaged lever.
  3. Personally, I hate those things. I spent many years in bike sales and have seen dozens of crashes and damaged calipers, fork lowers, brake rotors, egos from these things. Even the ones with the alarms can't seem to prevent people from trying to ride off with them still on. If a thief wanted your bike with a disk lock, all they would have to do is to remove the rotor bolts on the locked rotor, and drive off with the rotor spinning on the hub until they got a few blocks away to shatter the potmetal lock with nitrogen and a hammer... or just replace the rotor with the lock on it. And then there are the tip overs and a pair of furniture dollies... but that is another story. Besides, people still aren't really stealing Vics, if they wanted a heavy cruiser, most thieves would steal the other American brand, anyway... their crowd has more of a demand for stolen parts. I recommend locking the forks on a bike as large and heavy as the Vision, and get full coverage, maybe LoJack. Disk locks? Fuggetabout it. If someone really wants your bike bad enough, they will defeat most all security measures. If someone can just pick up my Vision and walk away with it... I ain't gonna stop him. IMHO, of course.
  4. Hmmm... perhaps the only thing that has changed is that the powder coating has changed the way some of the ground or conductivity connections work. Powder coating can make a pretty good insulator...
  5. I used to carry a bunch of stuff for my '99, but for my Vision I only carry a flashlight, some allens, a multi-tool, credit card & cell phone & spare key. The best thing to bring is a fellow rider, tho...
  6. Nope. In over 50 oil changes on my '99 oil head Vic, I never bothered. Ditto my Vision, never bothered, won't be a problem for me, ever. Oils have gotten pretty good over the years... yeah, how old are your cars? You're not still running babbitt bearings, are ya'?
  7. Chromed cylinders, chromed rings... don't bother. I put over 150k on my '99 Vic, no problems. Oh yeah, I live in Kalifornia, we ride year 'round... my bikes never sit for more than a week between rides. Never mind. But, if I was to store a bike... I would top off the gas tank with some stabilizer, change the oil and filter, remove the spark plugs and drop a half teaspoon of motor oil into each cylinder (with a turkey baster) and crank it over (no plugs) to coat the cylinders, put the plugs back in, and store the bike with the battery on a tender.
  8. ! am designing this years V2V ride graphics to commemorate Sydney, it is already in the works... Mike (buddahead) VMC Graphics Committee Chairperson
  9. Sorry for jumping this thread. Please read my thread, "VMC member in a fight for her life...", as it pertains to the V2V. Again, apologies...
  10. Manny, it looks like Mark & I will meet you folks in Galt. That is, if us old-timers are allowed...
  11. I would do the logical thing and put the old plugs back in.... you may have a bad plug. Also, take a good look at the inside of your plug boots, check for damage or arcing. I have seen a bike run fine, but develop a vibration due to the occasional miss due to a bad wire. The bike ran fine until the owner broke the plug wire (internally) by pulling on it the wrong way. Did anything else change? Having ridden for over 40 years, I have seen a lot of weird things. Once I swore my bike had developed a vibration, but found it was a new pair of riding boots that transmitted the vibes through the soles. A friend swore his bike developed a vibration, but found it was his seat... he had changed it and the new one forced him to lean forward, putting more weight on his hands. I say look for the weird stuff... miss directed carb cleaner, internally broken plug wire, loose plug boot, etc.
  12. Whatever adhesive you use, clean the inside of the grip and the bar to remove any traces of old adhesive and oil.
  13. I always seem to post late... anyway, the connector between the stator and voltage regulator fills up with oil on the earlier bikes, a combination of capillary action, crankcase pressure & funky design... so this can cause some issues, you may want to clean this out from time to time, using contact cleaner. A long term fix would be to upgrade the charging system to the higher output one... the additional benefit is that your TPS will last longer with the higher voltage.
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